Hispanic Heritage Month Honored at Molloy

On October 15 in honor of Hispanic Heritage month, the Department of Modern Languages along with the Department of Sociology & Anthropology, hosted the event entitled, "Truths and Myths: Hispanic Immigrants on Long Island" led by Silvia

Silvia Pastor Finkelstein speaking at Molloy

Pastor Finkelstein, Assistant District Attorney and Director of the Office of Immigrant Affairs from the Nassau County District Attorney's Office. The organizers, Dr. Susana Rubio, Dr. Angeles Placer, and Dr. Jeanne Kimpel were very pleased to see a great turnout from the Molloy community that included students, staff, and faculty alike. ADA Finkelstein showed rich and informative data and shared the efforts of her work with the audience members. She listed the many occupations Hispanic workers are employed in, and made it clear that the majority do in fact, pay their taxes as it Pastor Finkelstein, Assistant District Attorney and Director of the Office of Immigrant Affairs from the Nassau County District Attorney's Officewould impact their application for citizenship if they did not. Much of what she presented helped debunk many of the stereotypes of Hispanic immigrant groups. In fact, it was clear from her data that rather than committing crimes, which is a prevailing stereotype about immigrant groups, they were more likely to be victims of crimes. She gave examples which included employers of Hispanic construction workers who have withheld their pay and then threatened to call the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) if they complained. Additionally, ADA Finkelstein explained the crackdown on criminals who have impersonated ICE officers by knocking on the doors of people in Nassau County to extort them. Next, the audience heard about the wonderful Proyecto Caminos (Pathways Project) initiative launched by district Attorney, Madeline Singas, which provides support and mentorship to young middle-school children in Hempstead and Westbury.

Demi Sofocli, a student who attended the presentation as part of an extra credit opportunity in Dr. Kimpel's sociology class, stated, "I felt very appreciative of all the things in my own life, and it showed me how stereotypes can really affect people's lives".

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